IMMUNIZATION

Most people are aware of the importance of immunization. In this issue we try and explain the reasons behind immunization as well as giving some practical help with carrying out an immunization programme. 

Please find below articles from Footsteps issue 14.

To download a pdf version of Footsteps issue 14, please click here (PDF 4.4 MB).


  • Bible study: The blood of Christ

    The Blood of Christ. Blood may be thought of in many ways - it may be seen as a sign of weakness, injury and death. But we also talk of our ‘life blood’. Blood keeps our body healthy and alive. Blood may bring life to others by transfusions. Immunizations give our blood the ability to fight off diseases.

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  • Editorial

    There is a huge difference between telling someone to do something because it is good for them and explaining clearly why something is good for them so they can make up their own minds. Most people are aware of the importance of immunization. In this issue we try and explain the reasons behind immunization as well as giving some practical help with carrying out an immunization programme.

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  • Immunization in Disaster Situations

    by Dr Edwin J Pugh. In disaster and refugee situations, infectious diseases are a potential major health hazard. This is due to a variety of factors including overcrowding, an unsanitary environment and poor nutrition. A mixture of people living in crowded, dirty conditions with low resistance to disease because of malnutrition, is a situation where infectious diseases may be severe and spread rapidly unless effective control measures can be established.

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  • Immunization: The practical details

    Except where marked otherwise, the diagrams on this page are taken from the book Immunization in Practice produced by WHO. Used with kind permission of Oxford University Press.

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  • Letters

    Purple chicks! Referring to the tips in Issue 10, please note that when chicks are dyed with gentian violet (to protect them from predators) they could be rejected by the mother hen if it is done during the day. The correct practice is to dye them during the night so that the mother hen stays with them throughout the night. Once this is done she easily identifies them and accepts them. If this process is carried out during the day, your heart will bleed watching the mother hen tearing her ...

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  • Newcastle Disease: Vaccines for village chickens

    by Professor P B Spradbrow. Most rural families in developing countries keep chickens, even those families that are too poor to own other animals.  These chickens must scavenge for most of their food, although sometimes they receive household scraps as well.  The chickens are not penned up and often they lack even basic housing.  Village chickens are available for sale or barter and they provide meat or eggs.  All too frequently a serious disease called Newcastle disease ...

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  • Organising for immunization

    by Sandra Michie. The needs Years ago in Zambia our tiny mission hospital was regularly over-filled with epidemic patients. Whooping cough and measles were the two worst and best remembered epidemics. In 1967 at least one child died from measles in every surrounding village. Often three or more died and since villages were very small - often with just one extended family - you can imagine the grief and despair.

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  • Resources

    How to look after a refrigerator by Jonathan Elford. An expanded and updated version of this popular manual has recently been published by AHRTAG. The 58 page book is written for health workers in hot climates who are responsible for storing vaccines. Vaccines play a vital role in protecting children from serious illness, yet a large proportion of vaccines become useless during transport or storage because of refrigeration failure.

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  • Tetanus

    Tetanus is a very serious disease which makes a person’s muscles contract and become very stiff. It is very difficult to treat and over half of the adults who catch tetanus will die.

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  • The Knotty Problem of the Haunted Wells

    In Footsteps No.12 we reported that people living near Mengo Hospital in Uganda preferred to drink dirty river water instead of the clean water offered to them because of their fear of spirits.

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  • The Mukombe

    A useful idea sent in by Andrew Maclean, WaterAid, Rukungiri, Uganda.  

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  • The Transport of Tree Seedlings

    by Michael Madany. When I began doing agroforestry work with communities in Somalia in 1985, I wondered how to solve the problem of transporting tree seedlings. Tree seedlings grown in polyethylene tubes need great care while they are being carried to make sure they are not damaged before planting.

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  • Understanding Immunization

    by Dr Tom Crusz. Years ago, smallpox was a dreaded disease which killed huge numbers of people all over the world. No treatment could be found. People who survived the disease did not catch smallpox again. They had become ‘immune’. Cows also suffered from a form of smallpox called cowpox. An English Doctor, Edward Jenner noticed that people who caught cowpox did not catch smallpox.

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