MOTHER AND CHILD CARE

Most health workers would agree that working with mothers and children is the most important part of health work in a community.  This is because the health needs of mothers and children are especially great and because mothers with children make up over half the population. In this issue we can only look at a few of the many subjects concerning mother and child health. But we hope that this issue will bring some helpful new ideas to discuss and try out. 

Please find below articles from Footsteps issue 8.

To download a pdf version of Footsteps issue 8, please click here (PDF 3.1 MB).


  • A deadly disease

    By Sue Hanley. Angong was expecting her third baby. After a good pregnancy she was eagerly awaiting the birth. The birth pains began while she was collecting water. She returned home and prepared for the birth. There were two or three women in her village who helped at the birth of babies, so a message was sent to one of them to come and assist.

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  • Editorial

    Most health workers would agree that working with mothers and children is the most important part of health work in a community.  This is because the health needs of mothers and children are especially great and because mothers with children make up over half the population. In this issue we can only look at a few of the many subjects concerning mother and child health. But we hope that this issue will bring some helpful new ideas to discuss and try out. Let us know of other subjects you ...

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  • Letters

    A better pump? While studying the diagram of the water-lifting device (the rope-washer pump) in your last issue, I was struck by the idea of the very simple modification.

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  • Posters to encourage group discussion

    The ideas for these posters have come from work carried out by Veronika Scherbaum with the Oromo people in South Ethiopia, who have many traditional beliefs concerning mother and child care. Posters can be used to help encourage discussion of what people believe and why. Together this can lead to developing a more positive understanding of healthy mother and child care. Try adapting these posters to use among your community.

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  • Resources

    Helping Health Workers Learn By David Werner and Bill Bower, 632 pages, ISBN 0-941364 This lengthy paperback book is packed full of ideas, methods and aids for anyone involved with the training of health workers. It is very practical, using only simple materials for teaching aids. There is a great understanding of the need to build on traditional beliefs. It is a book that no-one working with health workers should be without. It is written by the author of “Where there is no Doctor”. Very ...

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  • Traditional birth attendants

    By Dr Godwill Asiimwe Okiror. Traditional birth attendants (TBAs) are found in most societies. They are usually older ladies. They conduct over two thirds of the deliveries in the world, yet the majority are illiterate and are not trained in modern medicine.

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  • Update on vitamin A

    By Professor Andrew Tomkins. It has been known for many years that Vitamin A deficiency can cause blindness. In the early stages, the individual complains of not being able to see well at night (night blindness). As the deficiency develops, the lining of the eye becomes dry and cloudy. Eventually, small ulcers may develop and unless vitamin A is taken quickly, the eye is permanently damaged. Vitamin A deficiency is often brought about by illness, particularly diarrhoea and measles, and is ...

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