Resources

Conflict

Working with Conflict: skills and strategies for action
ISBN 1 85649 837 9

This source book is for people working in areas affected by conflict and violence. It will be useful for all those who are working in conflict-prone and unstable parts of the world in the fields of development, relief work, human rights, community relations, peace and reconciliation.

Easy to use, well laid out, and including helpful visual materials, it provides a range of practical tools – processes, ideas, visual aids and techniques – for tackling conflict. These tools have been developed over a number of years by Responding to Conflict (RTC), in collaboration with practitioners from around the world. It includes examples from Cambodia, Afghanistan, South Africa, Kenya, Northern Ireland and Colombia. The book explains the options available to individuals and organisations, equips them to plan appropriate responses and strengthens their capacity to engage in useful interventions.

Books can be bought by emailing RTC on enquiries@respond.org or by writing to:

Responding to Conflict
1046 Bristol Road
Birmingham
B29 6LJ
UK

Cost: £15* plus postage and packing *mention Footsteps to pay this reduced price

ROOTS 4: Peace-building within our communities
ISBN 1 904364 12 8 

This Tearfund guide is ideal for Christians who are working in conflict situations and seeking to bring peace. It explores conflict and reconciliation theory and gives a biblical basis for involvement in peace-building. It shares learning from Tearfund partners who work in the field of peace and reconciliation and includes many practical ideas for peace and reconciliation initiatives. This guide is available in English, French, Spanish and Portuguese.

ROOTS 4 can be ordered by writing to:

The Tearfund Publications team
Tearfund
100 Church Road
Teddington 
TW11 8QE
UK 

It can be downloaded free of charge from this TILZ website (www.tearfund.org/tilz).

Previous issues of Footsteps

  • Footsteps 88 – Managing Disasters  This issue featured an article on ‘Working with displaced people’ which is relevant to conflict situations. 
  • Footsteps 68 – Forgiveness and Reconciliation  Focusing on how we respond to conflict and seek to build a lasting peace, this issue features articles such as ‘Learning to resolve conflict’ and case studies from Colombia, DRC, Northern Ireland and Cambodia. 
  • Footsteps 36 – Coping with Conflict  This issue from 1998 includes a feature on ‘How people respond to conflict’ and a Bible study on ‘Loving our enemies’. 

All issues of Footsteps can be read on, and downloaded from this website. Hard copies can be requested by contacting the Editor and will be sent subject to availability. 

Interesting websites

Insight on Conflict (www.insightonconflict.org

…provides information on local peace-building organisations in areas of conflict. It features case studies, blogs and resources. It is an initiative of Peace Direct (www.peacedirect.org), a UK-based charity that finds, funds and promotes local peace-building in conflict situations.

The Conflict Sensitivity Consortium (www.conflictsensitivity.org
…exists to promote conflict sensitivity in the development and relief sectors. Their helpful ‘How to guide to conflict sensitivity’ is available to download from their website. 

Family Links Network

In times of armed conflict or natural disasters, family members can become separated. The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement (including the International Committee of the Red Cross and National Societies) works around the world to locate people and put them back in contact with their relatives. It is also able to exchange family messages when normal means of communication have broken down. The Movement’s ability to trace people depends on the information provided and local circumstances, including the security situation.

The Movement is a neutral and impartial humanitarian network. It welcomes people of all faiths and of none, and seeks to serve all according to need alone. To trace a missing relative or for more information, visit www.familylinks.icrc.org or contact your National Society office.