HOME GARDENS.

Our health is affected by what we eat. Without a healthy, balanced diet, we will not have healthy bodies able to fight off diseases. In this issue we are looking at ideas to help with farming for better nutrition.

God was pleased with his creation. We are to be good stewards of the land which we have. Productive home gardens are one way of ensuring not only that we are caring for the land and maintaining the soil, but also producing a varied and nutritious diet for our families. In some parts of the world, home gardens are not common, but most people will find that the ideas in this issue can be adapted to their own situation. 

Please find below articles from Footsteps issue 7.

To download a pdf version of Footsteps issue 7, please click here (PDF 3.3 MB).


  • ECHO for you

    by Dr John Townsend, Medical Director of ECHO. An anxious mother brought her child to me: ‘What’s the problem?’ I asked. ‘She pushed a hard black bean into her ear three days ago and it won’t come out.  Now it’s really hurting her.’

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  • Editorial

    Our health is affected by what we eat. Without a healthy, balanced diet, we will not have healthy bodies able to fight off diseases. In this issue we are looking at ideas to help with farming for better nutrition.

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  • Improved farming for better nutrition

    by Martin Rowland. Kagando Rural Development Centre is situated in the foothills of the Ruwenzori Mountains in Western Uganda.  It started as a small hospital in 1965 and has continued to grow and develop since then.

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  • Letters

    Empowering people. It is with interest that I have been reading your magazine, Footsteps.  It is indeed a thought-provoking paper aimed at creating a sense of communion with others, thus empowering people to listen to others in a variety of ways within the wholeness of creation.

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  • Maintaining soil fertility

    Compiled by Isabel Carter. Soil used for growing crops must have plant nutrients and organic matter added in order to maintain the fertility and quality of the soil. Soil which is well cared for will continually produce good yields. If plant nutrients and organic matter are not added, soil will become exhausted after a few years, and yields will drop. Chemical fertilisers will add plant nutrients, but are expensive. The methods on this page are inexpensive and will add both plant nutrients and ...

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  • Partners in Plant Production: Rhizobia and Mycorrhizae

    by Mike Carter. Plants, like people and animals, need feeding.  Plant nutrients (or foods) such as nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium are needed for the growth and development of crops and trees.  Farmers can add more of these nutrients to the soil by using manure, compost or artificial fertilisers.

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  • Resources

    Agriculture in African Farming Communities by Hugues Dupriez and Philippe De Leener English Edition, 1988 (294 pages)ISBN 0-333-44595-3French Edition, 1986 (282 pages)ISBN 2-87105-000-7

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  • Small Gardens for Food Production

    by Dr Pamela M Goode. And God said ‘Let the earth put forth vegetation, plants yielding seed, and fruit trees bearing fruit in which is their seed, each according to its kind upon the earth.’  And it was so.  And God saw that it was good.'Genesis 1:11-12

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  • Technology for Garden Irrigation

    by Robert Lambert. Lifting and carrying water in buckets or cans to irrigate crops is very hard work and can take a lot of time.  In Zimbabwe, some families spend up to 200 hours per month on this exhausting job.  This can mean three to four hours every day for two or three people in the family.  The only alternative presently available is a diesel or petrol pump - out of reach of most small farmers because of the high cost, the problems in obtaining fuel and spare parts and the ...

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  • Wild edible plants and leafy vegetables

    by Dr Angelika Dietz. Wild edible plants and leafy vegetables often make an important contribution to the diet, particularly in a rural population.  This can often be overlooked by community workers.  The role of wild edible plants in the diet is described here for the subsistence farming community of Magar, living in a remote area of the mid-west region of Nepal.

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