SOIL EROSION

It is sadly true that in many parts of the world our parents can remember a very different environment from that of today. Deserts have grown. Fertile land has become poor. People are fighting to overcome these problems in many different ways. Soil erosion has become such a widespread problem that most countries now have government programmes to control erosion, programmes that add to the efforts of the farmers themselves. 

Please find below articles from Footsteps issue 15.

To download a pdf version of Footsteps issue 15, please click here (PDF 4 MB).


  • Bible study: Our stewardship of the environment

    Our stewardship of the environment by Suleiman Jakonda of RURCON, Nigeria. Read Genesis 1:26-31. God created all things and there was perfect harmony between all creation and God. But as we read in Genesis 3:14-19, the fall brought about sin and separation from God for both mankind and creation - breaking the perfect harmony that had existed.

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  • Community Based Health Care: Who is in control?

    by Keith Wright. The idea of having community based activities has become very fashionable in development work and especially in primary health care. The term community based was originally used to try to describe health development work that happens in a community far away from a health unit. Up to that time the services of a clinic or a mobile clinic were the closest way in which health care came to the homes of people. The clinics were organised by the health service and carried out their ...

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  • Contour Lines

    Compiled by Isabel Carter. These are imaginary lines across a slope which are the same height at all places along the slope. Water cannot flow along a contour line - it is completely level. Most soil erosion control methods are built along the contour lines to have maximum effect.

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  • Editorial

    It is sadly true that in many parts of the world our parents can remember a very different environment from that of today. Deserts have grown. Fertile land has become poor. People are fighting to overcome these problems in many different ways. Soil erosion has become such a widespread problem that most countries now have government programmes to control erosion, programmes that add to the efforts of the farmers themselves.

    Read More
  • Growing Walls

    This is an interesting and very practical idea developed by Gösta Nilsson, the Director of Sanitas in Botswana. He has developed a container gardening system based on walls with built-in growing boxes, made of hollow concrete blocks. The blocks are made using a simple, hand-operated block-making machine. With such a machine, two persons can make 100 blocks a day from a mix of 1 part cement and 4 parts sand. This is the size block which is used at Sanitas, but blocks of similar size would be ...

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  • How soil erosion happens

    by Mike Carter. Imagine you need to push a loaded cart down a gentle slope. You first have to get the cart moving - this may need quite a hard push. Once the cart is moving, a steady, gentle push may keep it moving down the slope. Getting the cart moving in the first place takes a lot of effort - keeping it moving is easier.

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  • Letters

    More help from children I have read with interest in Footsteps No 12 about involving children in development work. I, too, think it is a good and important thing to consider. I would like to share with you what we have done on our programme with children.

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  • Resources

    Looking After Our Land by Will Critchley and Olivia Graham This book and accompanying video draws together the experiences of six soil and water conservation projects in dryland regions of Kenya, Mali and Burkina Faso. The projects are very different - some government, some non-government - with different approaches to similar problems. As a result, the general principles that are drawn from the six case studies could be very helpful to groups planning similar work.

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  • Soil and water conservation and the community

    by Will Critchley and Olivia Graham. Soil erosion - the removal of good soil by wind or water - is a growing problem world-wide. As the world population increases, more pressure is put on land to produce food, fuel and building materials. Trees are removed to grow more crops. Often land is no longer left to rest between cropping. With the removal of trees and forests, there is a direct effect on water supply. Less rainwater is able to soak into the soil and, in some places, wells and springs ...

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