FOOD SECURITY

Food security is an issue often discussed at government level or at numerous international conferences. However, we believe food security is most likely to be achieved when food is locally produced, processed, stored and distributed. There are many other topics we could have included but hope we have provided enough useful ideas to start you thinking. We would encourage you to follow the ideas shared by Pukuta Mwanza and set up discussion groups or workshops in your village or urban community to discuss local food security issues.  

Please find below articles from Footsteps issue 32 in html.

To download a pdf version of Footsteps issue 32 click here (784K).


  • An improved granary design

    An improved granary design Simple improvements to traditional granaries may reduce the loss of grains to pests and diseases without requiring financial outlay.

    Read More
  • Bible study: Enough is as good as a feast

    Enough is as good as a feast by Stan Crees God's word has much to teach us about food, its provision, storage, benefits and our responsibility to share it. Read Psalm 65. This provides a clear example of God’s generous nature. Here God is seen to bless the land with showers so that crops grow abundantly, providing more than is needed. There are similar passages in Psalms 68, 104 and 107.

    Read More
  • Community Grain Banks

    by Pasteur Samuel Yameogo. Burkina Faso is a land-locked country in West Africa with only one short rainy season. There are often severe food shortages in the drier northern areas. Since the 1980s when there were several years of famine, community grain banks have become popular throughout the country, providing a village-based solution to critical food shortages. Grain banks make food supplies available at the hardest times of the year at carefully controlled prices. ODE has supported the ...

    Read More
  • Coping with drought

    by Pukuta N Mwanza. Luangwa and Gwembe are two regions of Zambia which have been severely affected by five years of continuous drought. These droughts have left farmers poorer than before because they have been forced to sell their assets – livestock, equipment – and use up their savings to survive.

    Read More
  • Editorial

    Plans for this issue began with the theme ‘storing the harvest’. But then we felt it important to widen this subject to that of food security which raises many more issues. A useful definition of food security comes from von Braun (1992): ‘Access by all people at all times to the food required for them to lead a healthy and productive life’. With over 800 million people in the world today known to be hungry, some 190 million children known to be underweight, 230 million children known to ...

    Read More
  • Fermentation

    by Dr Ann Ashworth. The benefits of fermentation have been recognised from the earliest times. There are records of fermented foods being used by the Sumerians, ancient Egyptians, Babylonians and Assyrians. Chinese descriptions of miso from soy sauce go back to 1000 BC. Other foods that are commonly fermented are milk (to make soured milks and yoghurt), cereals and cassava.

    Read More
  • Food storage and preservation

    There are many different blocks which may prevent the storing and preserving of food. Selling food Farmers may sell much or all of the food they produce immediately because:

    Read More
  • Grain storage

    30% of fruit and vegetables are wasted due to the unavailability of proper processing and preserving. Here are some practical ideas from different sources.

    Read More
  • How to make jam

    All kinds of soft fruit can be used to make jam. If possible, use a book of jam recipes which will tell you exactly how much fruit, sugar and water to use for each different fruit. However, if you cannot find such recipes, here are the general principles of jam making.

    Read More
  • Ideas for health training

    I'd like to share some training activities which I have developed with the help of village people to encourage discussion on health and nutrition.

    Read More
  • Letters

    Urban agriculture Market gardeners in the Boma area of lower Zaire are not economically strong. We used the INADES lessons as a group and realise that we need to market ourselves more positively to improve our situation. We need to improve our production of vegetables but we also see other important areas:

    Read More
  • Moulds for ferro-cement tanks

    Greetings from the Kingdom of Swaziland. I’d like to share a few comments on the ferro-cement tank in Footsteps 30. Since 1994 I have been involved with a tank-building programme with local churches and several hundred have been constructed, both in Swaziland and South Africa. We have a good teaching video available in Zulu.

    Read More
  • Promoting local conservation

    by Miges Baumann. Anibal and Orelina Correo live in the village of Boliche in Simiatug, Ecuador. They tell their story of their use of new potato varieties developed at the National Institute for Agricultural Research…

    Read More
  • Resources

    Henry Doubleday Research Association Tree Selection and Advisory Service This group provides information, advice and – where available – tree and shrub seeds to NGOs, self-help groups, farmers, schools and other organisations involved in forestry and agroforestry in developing countries.

    Read More
  • Rural women and food insecurity

    by Drs Neela and Amitava Mukherjee. For the 350 million people in India who live below the poverty line, food security is literally a matter of life and death. Agriculture supports nearly 70% of the population in India, most of whom own less than 2 hectares of land.

    Read More