INSECT-BORNE DISEASES

Malaria threatens 40% of the world’s population and kills about 2.5 million people every year. Most are children under five or pregnant women. In sub-Saharan Africa an estimated 70 million pre-school age children are at risk of dying of malaria. In addition, malaria among adults affects their ability to do productive work. All this means malaria is one of the biggest public health problems in many developing countries. Like the other diseases that we look at in this issue, malaria is transmitted by insects. Often people despair of their ability to do anything in the battle against malaria, especially as health budgets may be reduced or essential drugs become unavailable. In this issue we try to look at positive steps which can be taken ‘on our own doorstep’ without access to large resources. 

Please find below articles from Footsteps issue 33 in html.

To download a pdf version of Footsteps issue 33 click here (855K).


  • A support system for women

    The Mahila Samakhya Programme of Bihar, India, began in the late 1980s with the aim of empowering women. In the state of Bihar, seven out of ten women are unable to read and write. The caste system is very strong. In addition, the ratio of women to men which used to be 1,060 to 1,000 is now only 911 to 1,000 – showing an alarming rise in the death rate of women.

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  • Bible study: God's plan for holistic development

    God’s plan for holistic development To discover a wonderful picture of how the kingdom of God will develop after Jesus returns, read Isaiah Chapter 65: 17-25. Understand that this is how God would like things to be right now if everyone was responsive to his will.

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  • Diseases, insects and environment

    by Professor Malcolm Molyneux. When you come to think about it, a surprising number of different diseases can be spread between people by insects. Some of these diseases will be discussed in this issue of Footsteps. They are among the most important and serious diseases in the world, especially in areas which are not yet industrially developed.

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  • Editorial

    Malaria threatens 40% of the world’s population and kills about 2.5 million people every year. Most are children under five or pregnant women. In sub-Saharan Africa an estimated 70 million pre-school age children are at risk of dying of malaria. In addition, malaria among adults affects their ability to do productive work. All this means malaria is one of the biggest public health problems in many developing countries. Like the other diseases that we look at in this issue, malaria is ...

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  • Fact files on insect-borne diseases

    Information compiled by Isabel Carter and based largely on information from IAMAT and WHO publications, including press releases, Tropical Disease Research and Control of Tropical Diseases.

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  • Insecticide treated nets

    by Professor Chris Curtis. Malaria is by far the most important insect-transmitted human disease. Latest WHO estimates are that there are 2.5 million deaths each year from malaria, mainly among African children.

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  • Keeping out mosquitoes

    Ccompiled by Uzo Okoli, Rod Mill and Isabel Carter. Keeping mosquitoes out of your home is the most important way of protecting your family from malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases. Here are a number of practical steps you can take.

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  • Letters

    An effective rat trap I farm ostriches in Zimbabwe. Recently I have had such a plague of rats, which even began attacking adult ostriches. Poison proved very expensive and I also lost some young ostriches that may have eaten the poison. In desperation I tried to make a rat trap which I had heard about in Mozambique. In 21 days with 9 traps I have caught 934 rats!!

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  • Malaria – some new approaches

    by Dr D C Warhurst. In countries where malaria is very common, many adults may carry the infection without any symptoms, but infants and pregnant women are much more likely to become ill with malaria. Drugs are mainly used to control the illness. However, they can also be used to prevent it for certain high-risk groups such as pregnant women, sickle cell anaemia sufferers and visitors who have no natural immunity.

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  • Resources

    Malaria: a continuing threat Issue No 6 of Child Health Dialogue was on the subject of malaria and its control. This newsletter is free to readers in developing countries. For further information write to the Publications Secretary at AHRTAG, address below.

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  • Solar cooking in the Gambia

    by Rosalyn Rappaport. Over 90% of people in the Gambia cook on wood fires and must spend their income or time fetching wood. The country is semi-arid. Both forests and the open, dry woodlands are shrinking as the growing population chops down trees and burns charcoal to supply its cooking stoves.

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  • The importance of soya in human nutrition

    We work with a programme aimed at preventing malnutrition in Guayaquil. We encourage the growth and use of soybeans. Though they are not traditionally grown in this area, local people have accepted them readily. Soya is a very useful food, high in protein, which can be substituted for meat, cheese, milk, eggs or fish.

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