NETWORKING

As Dr Dixon has stated, the global situation for AIDS is very serious. Previous issues of Footsteps have looked at practical concerns and information on this subject. However, there are now a great many excellent resources available – some of which are listed on the resources page. So in this issue we have instead chosen to highlight the need to work together at all levels, both in supporting people with AIDS or in educating people about the situation. The subject is an enormous one, but by combining our efforts, we can make a difference. The words chosen as their motto by CANA (Christian AIDS/HIV National Alliance), a network of Christian organisations across India, provide an inspiration for all of us:

… to bestow on them a crown of beauty instead of ashes, the oil of gladness instead of mourning, a garment of praise instead of a spirit of despair for the display of his splendour… Isaiah 61:3.

Please find below articles from Footsteps issue 44 in html.

To download a pdf version of Footsteps issue 44 click here (1016K).


  • AIDS – an exploding threat

    by Dr Patrick Dixon. AIDS threatens every recent step of progress in the developing world. With 50 million infected, we may still be in the early stages, hardly nearer an effective low-cost cure or vaccine than ten years ago. Many African nations are already weakened. Fields cultivated by children, villages struggling to function, while in towns and cities foreign investment melts away.

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  • Caring for the environment

    The Montaña de Guerrero region of Mexico has many problems and is one of the poorest areas of the country. The three ethnic groups who live there – the Mixteco, the Nahua and the Tlapaneco – survive through farming the steep slopes and raising cattle. Overgrazing, soil erosion and deforestation are common.

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  • COBAP Nakulabye

    COBAP (Community Based AIDS Programme) is a local response to HIV in one of the slum areas in Kampala. It has carried out a number of activities, mainly to improve health and so to reduce the impact of HIV/AIDS in the community.

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  • Editorial

    As Dr Dixon has stated, the global situation for AIDS is very serious. Previous issues of Footsteps have looked at practical concerns and information on this subject. However, there are now a great many excellent resources available – some of which are listed on the resources page. So in this issue we have instead chosen to highlight the need to work together at all levels, both in supporting people with AIDS or in educating people about the situation. The subject is an enormous one, but by ...

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  • Guinea pig husbandry

    I am delighted to be one of your readers and consider Pas à Pas a cross-roads of ideas! Our organisation (APPI) looks after nearly 400 orphaned children and street children in two towns near Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo. We help them with education and practical skills. Since their problems are more social than educational, we have started a small income-generating project: breeding guinea pigs. We give the children three guinea pigs each – two females and one male to breed. They are ...

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  • Health work with drug users

    Working within a network by Graciela Radulich. El Retoño is a Christian organisation which focuses on working with drug users within the poorer areas of the capital of Argentina, Buenos Aires. This organisation was begun in 1985 in order to offer complete rehabilitation (physical, psychiatric, social and spiritual) to male drug users who came voluntarily to ask for help.

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  • Ilinanga’s story

    by Dr Connie Osborne. Stories can help people learn more about HIV/AIDS. This story can be used as a training exercise with health workers or carers. Tell the story, changing the names to common ones in your area and then go through it again slowly, asking the discussion questions.

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  • Issues faced by networks

    by Roger Drew and David Kabiswa. Being part of a group can be extremely helpful, but it can also be a very challenging experience. Challenges often faced by groups of people with HIV include:

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  • Letters

    Treating animal skins Thank you for sending the back copies of Pas à Pas. Many things in them interested me, especially about goats. I have started to raise milk-goats. I do not yet know how to milk them, because they don’t like it and kick the dish over! What interests me most is how to treat the skins with natural plant products that we can find here in West Africa, because the products that are normally talked about are both impossible to find here and out of our price range. The skin has ...

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  • Networking organisations

    by David Kabiswa. The subject of networking for organisations is increasingly being talked about in development workshops and meetings.

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  • Networking people with HIV/AIDS

    by Roger Drew. If you talk to people working on HIV and AIDS or read the things they write, it is not long before you come across the word networking. What exactly does it mean? A simple definition might be coming together with other individuals or groups to benefit each other.

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  • Protection from lightning

    by Ronald Watts. Tropical countries throughout the world have considerably more lightning strikes than cooler countries. High exposed plateau areas with few trees seem to receive more lightning strikes than other areas. When people live in thatched huts the risks are higher. Zimbabwe holds the record for the highest number of people killed by a single flash of lightning, with 21 people killed in one hut near Mutare in 1975. 

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  • Resources

    Strategies for hope This excellent series has been mentioned many times in Footsteps over the years. There are now 15 titles in the series – the most recent are:

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  • Treated bed nets

    Recent research has been carried out to examine the effectiveness of insecticide treated bed nets. Here in Tanzania, malaria is the main cause of illness and death. Over 93% of the population is at risk of contracting the disease. Research findings showed that the use of treated bed nets reduced child deaths by 20% and reduced illness from malaria by 50%. Please make sure your bed nets are ready!

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