Photo: Tearfund
Photo: Tearfund

NUTRITION

Nutrition is a huge topic and in this issue we have chosen to concentrate on one of the most important stages of nutrition – the early years of life when a child learns to share in the family diet. This is a dangerous time for many young children. Two thirds of the deaths of young children aged 0–4 years in third world countries are associated with malnutrition. The types of food given and the way in which babies are encouraged to eat are so important. Healthy and well-nourished babies grow into strong children better able to fight off disease.

We hope this issue provides a variety of ideas to help improve nutrition in your community.

Please find below articles from Footsteps issue 52 in html.

To download a pdf version of Footsteps issue 52 click here (914K).


  • Asking questions

    All of us use questions in our daily lives. Frequently the kind of questions we ask may make important differences to the information we can gather. Asking the wrong kind of questions will limit the information discovered.

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  • Bible study: Traditions and customs concerning our food

    Traditions and customs concerning our food All cultures develop a variety of traditional beliefs and customs concerning food. Sometimes there are foods that people eat at special festivals. Some foods may be avoided on particular days. Foods which are avoided in one culture may be valued in an-other. Most of these beliefs have little impact on nutrition but there are some that have a considerable impact. For example, in many cultures pregnant or nursing women are not supposed to eat eggs – ...

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  • Feeding young children

    The three food groups A child’s diet should include food from the three food groups: Energy foods help children play and work. These are staple foods such as maize, rice and plantain, and oils such as vegetable oil and animal fat, and sugar.

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  • Feeding young children

    by Ann Ashworth. Good food is important for good health. Children who are well fed during the first two years of life are more likely to stay healthy for the rest of their childhood. During the first six months of a child’s life, breast milk alone is the ideal food. It contains all the nutrients needed for healthy growth as well as immune factors that protect against common childhood infections.

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  • Gardening for better nutrition

    by Ian Horne. Small food gardens near the family home have traditionally made an important contribution to family nutrition. Home gardens can help provide variety in the diet and supply vital vitamins and minerals, carbohydrates and proteins. Good nutrition helps the body to resist disease, so home gardens help improve family health.

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  • HIV and breast-feeding

    by Ann Ashworth. The HIV virus can be passed from an HIV-infected mother to her baby. This is called mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). It can occur during pregnancy, labour and delivery, and through breast-feeding. Antiretroviral drugs such as Nevirapine reduce the risk of MTCT.

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  • Letters

    Community approaches to disability Thank you for the excellent Footsteps issue on people with disabilities. Readers may be interested to hear of a new approach which bridges community-based rehabilitation and general community development work. We call this Community Approaches to Handicap and Disability (CAHD). It helps existing community development organisations to gain awareness, knowledge and skills to include people with disabilities in their existing work. CAHD tries to lessen the ...

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  • Resources

    Nutritious Food for Young Children A well-illustrated and simply written booklet full of ideas and information on feeding young children. The book has 42 pages and costs US $4. It is available from:

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  • Weaning practices in Nepal

    by Sanjay Kumar Nidhi. In Nepal, weaning traditionally begins with the Rice Feeding Ceremony (Pasne) where children receive their first meal. The ceremony is performed at five months of age for a girl and six months for a boy.

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