ANIMAL HEALTH

For many families, the animals they keep often act as their bank, providing them with a source of income for use in emergencies or for special occasions such as weddings and funerals. The loss of an animal through disease is therefore a real blow. If healthcare for people is often not adequate, it is certainly true that in many countries healthcare for livestock may be completely lacking. In this issue we therefore look at ways of improving animal health, through the training of paravets, through mapping the distribution of diseases, through an understanding of some of the many herbal treatments available, and through sharing the skills of drenching and treating animals for parasites. Though the emphasis in the articles is on rural livestock farmers, the techniques could all be used in urban areas where, although livestock officers may be available, many families would be unable to afford their services. 

Please find below articles from Footsteps issue 34 in html.

To download a pdf version of Footsteps issue 34 click here (909K).


  • Drenching

    Drenching is the forced pouring of liquid preparations down the throat of an animal. Drenching can be used for all livestock. During drenching, the animal’s head must be raised so that the liquid does not enter the lungs. A bamboo tube, gourd or bottle (glass or plastic) can be used for drenching ruminants and pigs.

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  • Editorial

    For many families, the animals they keep often act as their bank, providing them with a source of income for use in emergencies or for special occasions such as weddings and funerals. The loss of an animal through disease is therefore a real blow. If healthcare for people is often not adequate, it is certainly true that in many countries healthcare for livestock may be completely lacking. In this issue we therefore look at ways of improving animal health, through the training of paravets, ...

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  • External parasites - Protecting your livestock

    Protecting your livestock by Dr Avijit Haldar. The word parasite means ‘one who eats at another’s table’. In other words, a living thing which lives off another animal (or plant). Livestock parasites are the small pests which live by taking nutrients (usually blood) from their animal host.

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  • Improving animal health through paravets

    by Robert Bowen and Mirjam Andriessen. Nearly everyone has heard the term community health worker (or primary health worker). However, the term paravet is likely to be new to many. Paravets are the equivalent of community health workers but for animals instead of people! Like health workers, they may not receive formal training, but instead receive practical training within their communities.

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  • Letters

    Food security We work with a holistic development project in Laos. I am writing to comment on issues raised in the first article in the Food Security issue, No 32, as I question whether food security means having culturally acceptable food available. Does this mean only food which people have traditionally eaten? If so, then we can’t disagree more.

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  • Making the most of water

    A collection of ideas on storing and using it.. Moulds for water jars The water department in the Diocese of Kigezi, Uganda uses specially shaped wooden moulds which fit together to form the shape of a small water jar. Clay is used to smooth any gaps before plastering over the moulds with layers of cement. Once the mortar has set firm (within a day) the moulds can be removed through the lid of the jar. The Department has about ten similar sets of moulds which can be reused over and ...

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  • Mapping animal diseases

    by Naftally Felix Omondi. Transmara Western Group (TMWG) in Kenya is a small team of researchers which has volunteered to promote sustainable development. Members encourage the use of traditional knowledge in agriculture to help relieve poverty. They work through extension training, research and by networking with NGOs in seminars and workshops.

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  • Medicinal plants for animal healthcare

    by Ines Vivian Domingo. The use of plants to cure ailments is an age-old practice. The preparation of herbal medicines remains an important part of healthcare for both humans and livestock, especially in rural areas. Small and subsistence farmers in remote communities depend largely on the use of medicinal plants in the absence of veterinarians and modern veterinary medicines. And even if these were available, farmers could ill-afford to pay for the services or buy the medicines anyway. ...

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  • Paravet training in southern Sudan

    by Nimaya Kenyi Mogga. ACCOMPLISH is a local NGO in Terekeka District in southern Sudan. They have established a paravet project to improve animal health care in the area.

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  • Plants for animal healthcare

    by Ines Vivian Domingo. BEFORE USING A PLANT FOR TREATMENT Be very sure you have identified the correct plant. If you are unsure, ask people with skills in using herbal treatments for their advice. Never use a plant unless you are sure it is the right one.

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  • Resources

    Mujer y Salud Mental by Heve E Otero Through this pamphlet, EIRENE hope to contribute to a better understanding of women’s role in the family and in society. Their central objective is the pastoral and therapeutic care of the family. There is much useful data from a survey of the concerns and stresses on people today. This pamphlet will supply information and ideas to those working in development and family care.

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  • Working in groups

    A group is a collection of three or more people who meet on a regular basis for a common purpose. People work in groups to achieve what they are unable to achieve on their own.

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