A health worker in Malawi, where Tearfund partner Livingstonia Synod AIDS Programme (LISAP) has organised groups of churches to work with people living with HIV. Photo: Chris Boyd/Tearfund

From: Health and faith – Footsteps 102

First aid tips, health workers' stories, a Bible study on healing and much more

by Elizabeth Wainwright

Community Health Global Network (CHGN) is a small organisation with a big vision. We believe that things are better when we work together. 

CHGN brings together people who want to improve health and well-being in their area. We call these groups ‘Clusters’. There are currently Clusters in Myanmar, India, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia and Sierra Leone.  

Clusters come in different shapes and sizes. Some are urban, some are rural; some are made up of NGO staff and faith leaders, others are made up of farmers and community health workers. But they all have these things in common: 

Finally, some news: CHGN is changing its name to Arukah Network. The Hebrew word ‘Arukah’ means complete physical, mental and spiritual healing and restoration. It perfectly captures what we think health is about. If you would like to be part of the Arukah Network, please get in touch. 

Elizabeth Wainwright is Managing Director of CHGN. 

Website: www.chgn.org
Email: elizabeth.wainwright@chgn.org 


Caring for people with disabilities in India 

Lawrence Singh

Lawrence Singh is a member of CHGN’s Uttarakhand Cluster in India. He works for AKS Hope Project, which provides a wide range of health care services to people in need. 

Many people want to share any joy or sadness in their lives with the church. This provides a great opportunity for the church to get involved in health care. This is not a new idea. I remember about 15 years ago when HIV was so common in India, the church came forward. Now there is a shift and the church is beginning to engage with disability. We need to consider how to include disabled people in our churches. 

Recently, AKS Hope Project ran a retreat for people with disabilities and parents of disabled children. We did this with churches and other organisations. The church can be a family journeying with disabled children. 

We also encourage churches to run ‘Luke 14 dinners’. In Luke 14, nobody came to the rich man’s feast. So he told his servants to invite everybody who was in the street – the blind, the lame, everyone. We held one of these dinners in a big hotel once, and the churches paid for it from their offerings. 

It also helps to involve other faith groups. For example, if we are going to run a health camp, we ask the mosque, the temple and the church to announce it a few days before. This means that more people will hear about it. 

Sometimes there is a big gap between Christian organisations and churches. If this gap is reduced, you will see amazing results in health care. 

Website: www.akshopeprojectindia.org
Email: akshopeproject@gmail.com

Similarly Tagged Content

Share this resource

If you found this resource useful, please share it with others so they can benefit too.

Sign up now to get Footsteps magazine

Cover of Footsteps 112: Communicable diseases

A free digital and print magazine for community development workers. Covering a diverse range of topics, it is published three times a year.

Sign up now