TECHNOLOGY

This issue brings together a great variety of good, practical ideas, most of which have either been sent in by readers or have been requested. Most of these ideas cost very little to try out. We hope that all our readers will find something of interest in these pages. Simple technologies often encourage people to adapt ideas for their own use. Just because an idea works well in one situation does not mean it will be appropriate for every situation. Communities have their own sets of priorities, but will be very ready to accept new ideas if they meet these priorities. Let us know how successful you find some of these techniques. There were plenty more for which, alas, there was no room in this issue! 

Please find below articles from Footsteps issue 21 in html.

To download a pdf version of Footsteps issue 21 click here (692K).


  • Bible study: Discipleship courses

    Discipleship courses. The need to disciple Christians – especially new Christians – is very important. We are encouraged to do this in many places in the Bible – for example, Matthew 28:19–20 and 2 Timothy 2:2. The church often gives more attention to preaching and teaching. These are very important but, to enable people to grow in their faith, discipleship courses in small groups are also of great benefit. Such a course was developed at Kagando Hospital, Uganda by Louise Potts and ...

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  • Bicycle trailers

    Bicycles are found all over the world and are a very useful way of transporting people and loads. The use of a motor vehicle may often be impossible for a variety of reasons – usually because of the high cost, and sometimes because there are few accessible roads. Without transport it is very difficult to carry quantities of goods to market. Adapting bicycles to carry loads more effectively can bring great benefits.

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  • Editorial

    This issue brings together a great variety of good, practical ideas, most of which have either been sent in by readers or have been requested. Most of these ideas cost very little to try out. We hope that all our readers will find something of interest in these pages. Simple technologies often encourage people to adapt ideas for their own use. Just because an idea works well in one situation does not mean it will be appropriate for every situation. Communities have their own sets of ...

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  • Fibre-cement tiles

    Fibre-cement tiles and bricks are a relatively recent development. They use less cement than conventional tiles and bricks and make use of locally available fibres, reducing costs, and making light, strong building materials. A wide variety of fibre-cement building materials can be made – tiles, blocks, gutters and curved blocks for water tanks. A special machine called a vibrator and the appropriate moulds need to be purchased. For simplicity, we will just consider the tiles in this ...

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  • Food coolers

    In high temperatures, cooked meals and fresh food such as meat, fruit or dairy products, will not stay fresh for very long. Food will quickly become unsafe to eat, often after just a few hours. Here are two simple ideas which help to keep food cool – and also covered and free from flies. They cost little to make and will keep food fresh for longer.

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  • Food drying

    Drying is one of the oldest methods of preserving food. Beans, cereals, meat and fish are commonly dried to preserve them. The drying of fruit and vegetables is less common but this technology is a very simple one and would greatly improve the variety in people’s diet. Tomatoes, herbs, mangoes and onions are examples of vegetables and fruit which can easily be dried and stored. Drying provides the opportunity for preserving good harvests instead of selling when market prices are low. Well ...

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  • Home-made plant dyes

    The cost and difficulty of obtaining synthetic dyes sometimes makes it impossible to make use of these for regular dyeing of material. If synthetic dyes are available their use is recommended, as they give good and permanent results. However, if synthetic dyes are not available it is possible to use home-made plant dyes. You can dye natural materials like cotton and wool with home-made dyes.

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  • Letters

    More uses of neem. While visiting rural villages, I found some more interesting uses of neem which I would like to share with Footsteps readers.

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  • Resources

    Drying – Food Cycle Technology Sourcebook No 6. By UNIFEM, the United Nations Development Fund for Women. 62 pages paperback.

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  • TB Treatment

    Issue 19 of Footsteps on TB and AIDS as always made interesting reading. Your cover article was very appropriate and timely, as WHO has already declared TB as a global emergency. It has established itself as a number one killer among all the infectious diseases in adults.

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